Wednesday, October 24, 2012

Thirteen Reasons WhyThirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

People don't understand that everything is connected. Everything we do, everything we say, no matter how insignificant or flippant, it can effect someone to the point that their life is altered.

In Jay Asher's novel "13 Reasons Why," Clay Jensen receives a box of tapes recorded by his crush, Hannah Baker, who had recently killed herself. On the tapes, she recounts exactly what happened leading up to her suicide, and pin pointing certain people and events that caused her to think that her life wasn't worth living anymore.

Her design for the tapes was that they were supposed to go, in order, to the people mentioned on the tapes. Everyone who got them had a hand in her decision. Clay, a decent enough chap, had no idea why he would be included on the list. He could have loved Hannah. He certainly had a crush, and they shared a nice kiss. Why would he be included on the list? That's for the reader to find out, because I'm not going to tell what happens.

That being said, I read this book extremely quickly. I was dying to find out what happened. How was Clay involved? Was it all a ruse? Was Hannah really dead? She seemed like such a lively, lovely person that you'd never imagine what kind of inner turmoil was happening. She wasn't a sharer. She was more of a "this is my life, and it's as good as it's gonna get"-type girl, I felt.

The people that she mentioned on the tapes probably had no idea the impact that their actions could have. She'd been labeled a tramp, among other things, because she'd accidentally, or inadvertently insulted someone. Rumors hurt. Maybe if she hadn't been bombarded with the rumors by so many people, she would have moved past it. Maybe there was something bigger at work. Whatever the case, Clay had some answered questions, but I had too many unanswered questions for my liking.

Example, I would have loved to have found out how the few people who received the tapes after Clay reacted. Would it have changed them? Would they have realized what they'd done? Sadly, it's difficult to say, but this was definitely a good read.

Written by Rebekah Martin, author of Sugar and Spies

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